How do you get your 5 plus a day on a budget

As a Frugal Kiwi Mum, it is important that my children eat the recommended daily servings of fruit and vegetables, however cost is also an issue. In this post we consider the implications of achieving your 5 plus a day on a budget. Fresh items are perceived as the healthiest options, however, frozen and even some canned products may contain similar or sometimes higher levels of nutrients, depending on the vegetable or fruit.

So how do you get your 5 plus a day on a budget?

The 5+ a-day campaign, which was started in 1994, recommends a minimum of two servings of fruits and three servings of vegetables per day. However, studies have shown that there are issues relating to the socio-economic groups intake of fruit and vegetables. Less wealthy people have tended to consume less fruit and vegetables.

Although the 5+ campaign does not actively promote including processed – for example tinned or frozen – fruit and vegetables, Dr Dresler-Hawke reported in 2007 that:

“In fact, research has indicated that fresh, frozen and canned [fruit and vegetables] are nutritionally comparable.” Fresh items are perceived as the healthiest options, however, frozen and even some canned products may contain similar or sometimes higher levels of nutrients, depending on the vegetable or fruit.

So what does this mean for our diets? And our pockets?

Dr Dresler-Hawke believes that consumers are more likely to meet the 5+ requirement if they include canned fruit and vegetables as there is less of a cost issue.

This means that using a 95c tin of Budget tomatoes to make spaghetti bolognaise will still count as 1 of your 5+ a day, but you won’t have to pay $14.99/kg as I remember tomatoes where last winter! A tin of fruit in JUICE is still healthy whilst being affordable but tinned Asparagus will still – ALWAYS- be gross!

There is no debating that a diet including fruit and vegetables is beneficial for us. Munch really likes to write and share information on fruits and vegetables. We have previously written loads of posts on the health benefits of individual fruits and vegetables like broccoli, tomatoes and oranges. Fruits and vegetables are packed with nutrients including vitamins, minerals, fibre and antioxidants. You can learn more about preparing and storing fresh vegetables here.

We hope you found this post on how to get your 5 plus a day on a budget useful?

Munch contributor, Frugal Kiwi Mum

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